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Overcoming Roadblocks to Journey Intelligence: Part 2 – Journey Mapping

March 19, 2021

Journey intelligence is a holistic view of the customer journey that enables rapid and informed decision-making to improve CX and business outcomes.

Traditionally, understanding customer journeys has been very complex, difficult, and expensive to achieve. But it doesn’t have to be. Help your company embrace journey intelligence by learning the common roadblocks that can arise and how to address them.

Roadblock #2: Journey Mapping Process and Procedure

Journey mapping has a few potential challenges:
  1. Mapping based on guesswork. Most companies have journey maps that are based on the highest-paid person’s opinion (sometimes called the HiPPO). Those maps may or may not have any correlation to what customers are actually doing.

    It can be a useful exercise to chart out the “happy path,” that is, what you want customers to do. But how do you know what the customers are really doing? Moreover, if they aren’t doing what the “happy path” map says, what’s next? How do you know if the HiPPO is correct in their assumptions about your customers?

  2. Treating journey mapping as the end goal. We’ve worked with organizations who pay consultants millions of dollars to map out and create visuals for every conceivable persona and journey. Once the project is done, they put the maps in a binder and store them away.

    The benefit of mapping is exponentially increased if you integrate maps with analytics, orchestration, and other journey efforts.

    Keep referring to them and updating them. Journey maps are a means to an end, and the end is understanding customers, improving experience, boosting revenue, and cutting costs. Journey maps are not, in and of themselves, the end.

  3. Overcomplicating the project. We work with very mature, well-resourced, Fortune 50 companies that have a seemingly limitless number of journey maps.

    While it’s possible to map very specific journeys according to each task (such as ordering checks online, finding a local branch, or any of the hundreds of things you can do on a bank’s website), that’s not where you should start.

    First, decide on your most important customer journeys, which is usually related to your most important business goals. Map a single journey.

    Once you (and your executives and teams) have seen the value of journey intelligence on a single journey, the next ones will be easier.

Suggestions

  1. Base journey maps on real data. If you have analytics, you probably have enough information to base your journey maps on real data. You can still create “happy path” maps, but you’ll be better informed about what is actually happening.

  2. Involve stakeholders early. Journey mapping requires input from many business units. Share the importance of journey maps with them, and involve them early in the process.

  3. Share progress. Because maps are so often created and then forgotten, share wins with your team. It’s important for them to understand how maps are used in managing the business going forward.

  4. Start small. It may be your goal to eventually get to 100 or more journey maps. But you don’t have to start there. Choose the 3-5 most common journeys for your industry and get clear on those before biting off more than you can chew.

Stay tuned for more in this series.


Traditionally, understanding customer journeys has been very complex, difficult, and expensive to achieve. But it doesn’t have to be. Help your company embrace journey intelligence by learning the common roadblocks that can arise and how to address them.

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